Pretty boys and corsets

18-year-old girl from Finland. Reblogging lots of random stuff. Art blog: aviala-doodles

Anonymous asked: hyvä niksi! pelatkaa spiritismin sijasta vaikka monopolya, eikö se ois ihan kiva JA PALJON VÄHEMMÄN HAZARDIA

jethroq:

21474:

paskahalvaus:

some like to live dangerously

Vittu älkää pelatko Monopolya, vaarallista paskaa sekin.

Monopoly oli aiheuttanut neljä murhaa vuoteen 2012 mennessä.

ei mutta jos pelaat Monopolia keskiyöllä täydenkuun aikaan, Alexander Stubb ilmestyy kotiisi ja laskee korkeimpien tuloluokan tuloveroprosenttia ja leikkaa sosiaalitukia.

twentydeepsteps:

twentydeepsteps:

I ACCIDENTALLY PRINTED A VERY TINY VERSION OF MY ASSIGNMENT & IM GONNA HAND IT IN AS A JOKE

update on this post; my prof laughed so hard she cried and she’s going to show it to all of her teacher friends omg

twentydeepsteps:

twentydeepsteps:

I ACCIDENTALLY PRINTED A VERY TINY VERSION OF MY ASSIGNMENT & IM GONNA HAND IT IN AS A JOKE

update on this post; my prof laughed so hard she cried and she’s going to show it to all of her teacher friends omg

(via lo-tt-a)

katzmatt:

co-ver:

Video games are great, they let you try your craziest fantasies. For example, on the sims, you can have a job and a house

In skyrim you can eat 100 cheese wheels in under a minute 

(via novadille)

notyourexrotic:


This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZPhoto credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

(via lo-tt-a)